Blog : Design (UI/UX)

The Power of Colors in Branding

The Power of Colors in Branding

Colors are vital to the success of your brand.

color wheel, branding

Often times the importance of colors are overlooked when branding. The color palette for your brand should be determined only after research of your target audience and once the personality of your brand is defined. How easy would it be for a new business owner to simply pick their favorite colors for their brand? Super easy, but it shouldn’t work that way!

Step One:

The colors chosen for your brand should tie along with the purpose and the personality you want to convey to your customers.

Let’s imagine a few scenarios really quick:
Imagine if the whole world was blue. Trees were blue, grass was blue, your skin was blue, everything blue.
How would you feel? Which emotions would you feel most?
Again, imagine if the whole world was red? How about black?

[inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”@amd5555″ suffix=””]Our emotions change with the colors we see. Every color has a purpose and a personality attached to it.[/inlinetweet]

Allow me  to help you get an idea of the type of colors best for your brand. You probably have an idea, but it’s usually not as apparent as it may seem.
You have a baby clothing brand, your colors should reflect pastels and should be gender neutral-yellow, green.
You have a Hawaiian restaurant. Your colors should reflect the Hawaiian community. Bright pinks, bright greens.

In regards to making your colors reflect your purpose, here at STANCE, our colors are red and tangaroa. Red is a bold, strong color associated with motivation and a desire to take action. Tangaroa (sample here) is a deep blue color. Dark blues instill trust and authority while still maintaining stability. We are trustworthy, highly motivated and action oriented, yet still stable and strong. Our colors reflect how we have positioned ourselves and our promise to our customers.

Choose the colors that will reflect your brand’s personality best-how you want the customer’s to perceive your brand. We are visual people. We get an idea of a person by what they’re wearing and the colors they use when presenting themselves. Your brand colors should do the same.

Color creates, enhances, changes, reveals, and establishes the mood of the painting. –Kiff Holland

Step Two:

These colors should relate to the brand’s target audience and still be visually appealing. During research, it should be determined the demographic of your primary audience and the colors that most influence them.

menvswomen colors when branding

 

Step Three:

A brand’s colors will also create consistency.  These colors will be everywhere in your business-logo design, collateral, websites, social media, packaging, etc. If it turns out the colors are not depicting what you had in mind, you’ll have to start over and that can be costly.

color branding collateral

 

Once step three is accomplished, the colors chosen for the brand should relate all of the personality the brand has to its target audience. The colors should also be used in all forms of business material to create consistency throughout the brand. Let your colors prove to the world your purpose.

The Power of Social Media

The Power of Social Media

Accessing the vast audience that is the internet, through social media, is a great way to elevate your brand to a higher audience.

At STANCE, we believe using social media for marketing purposes can not only enable small business to further their reach to more customers. But can also help consumers engage with each other before the sales push even ensues. Social media inevitably allows businesses to create and communicate with a vast array of communities, in a low-cost effective way.

social-media-marketing

Now when most people hear “social media” their mind almost always goes directly to creating content for consumers, well to consume, of course. But, according to Mikolaj Jan Pisorski, companies should be more focused on connecting consumers in a manner, so that they can develop social strategies under the umbrella of their brand.

Nike+

A notable example would be nike’s, “nike+” platform that allows users to interact with friends who use Nike’s digital products and synchronize them with the platform. The results of this endeavor have been impressive, and has been widely credited with contributing at least 30% increase in Nike’s athletic shoe sales.

the-power-of-social-media1

 

American Express

American Express, has also invested in a number of proprietary social platforms. The company’s “OPEN Forum” helps its small business cardholders connect and help each other with business issues.This has also yielded impressive results. Cardholders who used OPEN Forum functionalities were shown to be more more likely to recommend Amex credit card to others.

the-power-of-social-media2

 

Threadless

Threadless is an online community of artists and an e-commerce website. In 2000, co-founders Jake Nickell and Jacob DeHart started the company with $1,000 of their own money. Threadless designs are created by and chosen by an online community. They’ve managed to craft a cool creative community for one of the coolest audiences. A true example of building a business for a community and not a community for a business.

Threadless.com

 

HSBC

HSBC is also becoming a good place for local business owners to chat, due to its utilization of forums and online chatting systems. Much like American Express, users who use the forum are shown to be much more loyal to the company.

All and all, in the changing world of social media, a company that is able to break away from the norm and create a community rather than always selling something will come out on top.

 

Refrences


Information retrieved on May 26th, 2014: Olenski, Mikolaj Jan. “Social Media And Branding: A One On One With A Harvard Business Professor.” http://www.hbs.edu/faculty/Pages/profile.aspx?facId=10663, (web)

Information retrieved on May 26th, 2014: Olenski, Mikolaj Jan. “15 Examples of thriving online communities” http://www.feverbee.com/2010/11/15-examples-of-thriving-online-communities.html, (web)