Blog : brand

Rebrand -You Need To Let Go

Rebrand -You Need To Let Go

[inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”amd5555″ suffix=”#rebrandbreakup”]Going through a rebrand can be difficult. Like a break up. We didn’t necessarily end badly, but we still can’t be together. We need to let go.[/inlinetweet]

Let go of the negativity, let go of the bad memories, but still hold on to what makes you, well you. Because you’re cool! You just had someone else who made you seem less cool-and that sucks.

 

Rebranding is exactly the same. Your brand is cool. You already have traffic to your business, a well developed customer base, but you’re still lacking IT. You’re not where you want to be with your business, just like after a break up, you’re not where you want to be in life.

break up

So follow me through a post-breakup journey!

After a break up,

you probably change your look- a new haircut, new hair color, change outfit styles (btw, those shoes totally rock). How about a logo redesign for your business? Lets freshen up those colors, cleaner edges, a newer font! Because he was so last season…

After a break up,

you want to reconnect with your friends and the people you lost touch with when they were your everything. How about a customer survey or a social media campaign? Get to know your customers. Find out what they love about you, find out what they think you need to change (aside from drowning in your post breakup tears), and find out where they see you going. Their information is super valuable and FREE. They love you! They’ll do anything to see you succeed! Keep them around and use them to your advantage. It’s a win for you to have their input. It’s a win for them to see you flourish.

After a break up,

you want to be single. Single means you’re meeting new people, trying new things, and trying to find yourself again. Perfect! Find new customers, trying something fresh and hip-go with the times, but don’t lose that edge that made you different from everyone else. During the peak of love, we become comfortable, like our partners, satisfied. Single means we have a new lust for life! We become addicted to what the world is doing, and we want to become a part of it. Rebrand yourself! Rebrand your brand!

The hardest part after a break up is seeing things that remind you of that person wherever you go. “Oh, that’s where we shared our first milkshake together. That bench is where we had our first kiss. That new job is where he found his new girlfriend!”  <–that was a joke…

Anyway! It is hard, but nothing good is easy. We must strip ourselves of anything that is them, without losing ourselves, our core. Don’t go back! Doesn’t matter how many times they text you saying they miss you, or show up at your window with a boom box playing 80s classic rock. Doesn’t matter! You’re better than that! You’re on your way to doing great things.

I don't care how cute he is or if it completely melts your heart!
I don’t care how cute he is or if it completely melts your heart!

 

A rebrand is just the beginning.

 

Defining a Brand Name by Its Innuendos

Defining a Brand Name by Its Innuendos

The name of a brand is the key to its identity – it’s what people say when they recognize your logo or tagline. This name isn’t (or shouldn’t, at least) be taken lightly — it’s like naming your child; it requires some thought and deeper meaning.

However, not all babies are named as thoughtfully such as Fox India Owen, Bear Winslet, North West, Cricket Pearl Silverstein or the lovely Rosalind Arusha Arkadina Altalune Florence Thurman-Busson (yes, that’s one person).

Some brands have followed in these poor babies’ footsteps with unusual names (that don’t work) and oddly enough, several have some awkward sexual implications.

 

Kum & Go

Based in West Des Moines, Iowa, this convenience store attempted to do a play on the phrase, “come and go,” however I’m not sure if it was the best option they could have picked in 1975. If anything, they’re extremely memorable.

kum-and-go-stance-branding-agency-las-vegas

 

Smashburger

With the motto, “Smashed Fresh. Served Delicious,” Smashburger apparently does just that to serve tasty burgers (no matter it’s implications).

 

BJ’s (Restaurant | Brewhouse)

There are too many places with this name (from a wholesale club to a 99 cent store), but a prominent one here in Las Vegas is the restaurant BJ’s, where they promise you’ll be greeted with, “Welcome to BJ’s!”  They’ve been flaunting a good restaurant owned by BJ since 1978. Simply put, there’s too many inferences that can be made from this name.

bjs-stance-branding-agency-las-vegas

 

Grey Poupon

A Kraft Foods product, this dijon mustard may be the best-selling Dijon-style mustard (there isn’t much competition) in the U.S., but it also may make you second guess the process in making the condiment. It’s a partnership between Maurice Grey and Auguste Poupon since 1886, but no matter how you say it doesn’t sound like their tagline in the video below: “One of life’s finer pleasures.”


Now yes, it’s important to have thought behind your brand name (which all of these listed do), but it’s also important to realize how people will perceive your name. If you want sexual implications when people think of your restaurant, then go ahead and name it “BJ’s,” but if not then be sure to reassess that decision. [inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=””]It’s a risk to stick with an odd name, but just be sure to own it if you do.[/inlinetweet]

These companies below have odd names, but do a good job of making fun at themselves while still creating a positive face for their brand.

 

Fresh Body: Fresh Balls

A personal hygiene brand dedicated to keeping you “So Fresh and So Dry,” they really go all out to take care of a man’s genitalia. Also, don’t worry they feature Fresh Breasts too, ladies.

Thus, this video shows the very concern involved with a man’s sweat in his not so talked about regions.

 

Poo-Pourri

It’s literally what it sounds like. A freshener that you spray prior to dropping the motherload (or using the restroom) to prevent others from smelling what you just did in the bathroom.

This video shows their great use of playing on their awkward name and concept altogether.

 

[inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=””]So when you name your brand, be sure it’s something you’d proud to hear in conversation.[/inlinetweet] It’s just like naming your baby — you want it to thoughtful and meaningful. Unusual brand names are great, but only when they’re marketed appropriately and reach their desired audience.

 

Elevator of the Week: Bill Cunningham

Elevator of the Week: Bill Cunningham

Bill Cunningham- the legendary street-style photographer for The NY Times; fast, focused and able to tune out all but the shot he’s after, Mr. Cunningham reminds us of a war photographer, which is an unlikely thing for an 82-year-old fashion photographer. Bill does a the flip on war photography. He seeks out and captures humanity amid the storm of life, looking for what Harold Koda, curator at the Costume Institute at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, describes as “ordinary people going about their lives, dressed in fascinating ways.” [inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”@stancebranding @yvestng” suffix=”#branding #value”]Cunningham has established himself as a household name- creating his meaningful brand with his unrelenting beliefs on people and fashion. [/inlinetweet]

Mr. Cunningham is an embodiment of the 5 core values of STANCE – the basis of a strong meaningful brand.
Bill Cunningham today

He has given his all to his craft; creating the best. He has always delivered what was expected if not more. Bill Cunningham’s discerning eye sees through, and beyond, all that to what is real. He is unrelenting and at times off-putting seen when he compared two runway designs decades apart for their uncanny resemblance.

Seeing and expressing beauty in everything as Cunningham said, “It’s as true today as it ever was: he who seeks beauty will find it.” He has given a meaningful perspective on what clothing do for women and men alike. It was never about looking the best, but feeling the best you could possibly be regardless of all else. It’s about how the person felt in the clothes, and how they chose to present themselves to the public.

“The wider world perceives fashion as frivolity that should be done away with. The point is that fashion is the armor to survive the reality of everyday life. I don’t think you can do away with it. It would be like doing away with civilization.”

He presents a different perspective; a beautiful perspective.

[inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”@stancebranding @yvestng” suffix=”#branding #people”]The people; your audience or consumer is most important is what brands and/or companies forget in the long run. Bill never has, “Money is cheap, liberty, freedom that’s expensive.”[/inlinetweet]

Bill is known for tearing up checks when being paid by magazines and newspapers because as he said,  “You see if you don’t take money, they can’t tell you what to do, kid.” He has also traveled around New York and Paris on a bicycle for decades (now on his 29th bicycle as the other 28 were stolen), wearing the same street sweeper jacket, living in the same tiny no closet, kitchen, or private bathroom Carnegie Hall apartment until they tore down the apartments forcing him to move above Central Park; where he had them remove cabinets and appliances to make room for his files.

He never cared for fame and glory yet he achieved it anyway because his name, his brand is meaningful and strong. Genuinely interested in his audience; the people of New York.“I don’t pay attention to celebrities. I don’t photograph them. They don’t dress so… interestingly. They have stylists. I prefer real women who have their own taste.”

He cares about women who have their own tastes, and nothing else.

Bill Cunningham is a synonym for trustworthy. He is honest, but never brutal. He quit Women’s Wear Daily of the Chicago Tribune because they used his photographs as a worst dressed list to criticize women on their dress. He created an environment where men and women could be who they truly are, and not be critiqued. “I could never be a paparazzi, to torment people and chase them. I do it discreetly.” – his success is based on mutual trust and respect; a good face so to speak. Editors, icons, normal New York people may not stop for just any photographer, but they do for Bill; they even welcome him.

Cunningham photographs people and the passing scene in the streets of Manhattan every day, focusing on their genuine usage of clothing to express personal style. Allowing people to trust him and to never question his credibility. You can see by how he has gained the trusts of people constantly in the public eye.

“We all get dressed for Bill”, says Vogue editor Anna Wintour

Brooke Astor asked that Cunningham attend her 100th birthday party, the only member of the media invited.

Trust is key to a brand; people have to be able to trust a brand to do as they say and not cause problems for them.

Bill said, “The main thing I love about street photography is that you find the answers you don’t see at the fashion shows. You find information for readers so they can visualize themselves.” He takes fashion beyond the magazines and the runway elevating his name above the rest to be the first real street style photographer during World War II. He did something no one else did, and has stood out ever since because of his unrelenting love of what is real and out there. After taking a chance photograph of Greta Garbo, he published a group of impromptu pictures in the Times in December 1978, which soon became a regular series. His editor, Arthur Gelb, has called these photographs “a turning point for the Times, because it was the first time the paper had run pictures of well-known people without getting their permission.”

He transformed himself into a brand with these 5 core values- elevating himself above the rest while making strong statements in the industry. He has never changed regardless of fame or fortune he has lived the same way as he always has.  Can you make your own personal brand; your name quite as known and strong?

 

About the Elevator of the Week Series by Intern Yves

In the Elevator of the Week series we talk about people who are making a difference, and have created their own personal brand using the different values and techniques we here at STANCE use to support meaningful brands.

 

Bill Cunningham’s Work

What is Branding?

What is Branding?

What is Branding?

Branding is one of the most misunderstood terms. In my humble opinion this is what I believe branding is.

Branding is…

It is a carefully researched & planned initiative to articulate and clearly communicate what a company, product, or service stands for, who it caters to and it’s meaningful difference as opposed to other similar companies/products/services.

Research and Brand Strategy lay the foundation of a brand, then brand systems (logos, websites, color schemes, visual hammer, images, videos etc) communicate a brand’s value and it’s difference in a way that creates both an emotional and logical connection.

This is normally achieved through marketing, advertising, endorsements, community engagement and other forms of promotions.

Branding is a long term initiative that takes time.

For branding to be successful, you need to be clear, consistent & credible!

With today’s overcrowded marketplace, branding is becoming more and more valuable.

So next time someone asks you, “What is Branding?” have the understand what a brand is first, that then makes it much easier to communicate what branding.

See the infographic below;

what-is-a-brand-by-stance-las-vegas-branding-agency