Blog : What you stand for

Elevator of the Week: Bill Cunningham

Elevator of the Week: Bill Cunningham

Bill Cunningham- the legendary street-style photographer for The NY Times; fast, focused and able to tune out all but the shot he’s after, Mr. Cunningham reminds us of a war photographer, which is an unlikely thing for an 82-year-old fashion photographer. Bill does a the flip on war photography. He seeks out and captures humanity amid the storm of life, looking for what Harold Koda, curator at the Costume Institute at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, describes as “ordinary people going about their lives, dressed in fascinating ways.” [inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”@stancebranding @yvestng” suffix=”#branding #value”]Cunningham has established himself as a household name- creating his meaningful brand with his unrelenting beliefs on people and fashion. [/inlinetweet]

Mr. Cunningham is an embodiment of the 5 core values of STANCE – the basis of a strong meaningful brand.
Bill Cunningham today

He has given his all to his craft; creating the best. He has always delivered what was expected if not more. Bill Cunningham’s discerning eye sees through, and beyond, all that to what is real. He is unrelenting and at times off-putting seen when he compared two runway designs decades apart for their uncanny resemblance.

Seeing and expressing beauty in everything as Cunningham said, “It’s as true today as it ever was: he who seeks beauty will find it.” He has given a meaningful perspective on what clothing do for women and men alike. It was never about looking the best, but feeling the best you could possibly be regardless of all else. It’s about how the person felt in the clothes, and how they chose to present themselves to the public.

“The wider world perceives fashion as frivolity that should be done away with. The point is that fashion is the armor to survive the reality of everyday life. I don’t think you can do away with it. It would be like doing away with civilization.”

He presents a different perspective; a beautiful perspective.

[inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”@stancebranding @yvestng” suffix=”#branding #people”]The people; your audience or consumer is most important is what brands and/or companies forget in the long run. Bill never has, “Money is cheap, liberty, freedom that’s expensive.”[/inlinetweet]

Bill is known for tearing up checks when being paid by magazines and newspapers because as he said,  “You see if you don’t take money, they can’t tell you what to do, kid.” He has also traveled around New York and Paris on a bicycle for decades (now on his 29th bicycle as the other 28 were stolen), wearing the same street sweeper jacket, living in the same tiny no closet, kitchen, or private bathroom Carnegie Hall apartment until they tore down the apartments forcing him to move above Central Park; where he had them remove cabinets and appliances to make room for his files.

He never cared for fame and glory yet he achieved it anyway because his name, his brand is meaningful and strong. Genuinely interested in his audience; the people of New York.“I don’t pay attention to celebrities. I don’t photograph them. They don’t dress so… interestingly. They have stylists. I prefer real women who have their own taste.”

He cares about women who have their own tastes, and nothing else.

Bill Cunningham is a synonym for trustworthy. He is honest, but never brutal. He quit Women’s Wear Daily of the Chicago Tribune because they used his photographs as a worst dressed list to criticize women on their dress. He created an environment where men and women could be who they truly are, and not be critiqued. “I could never be a paparazzi, to torment people and chase them. I do it discreetly.” – his success is based on mutual trust and respect; a good face so to speak. Editors, icons, normal New York people may not stop for just any photographer, but they do for Bill; they even welcome him.

Cunningham photographs people and the passing scene in the streets of Manhattan every day, focusing on their genuine usage of clothing to express personal style. Allowing people to trust him and to never question his credibility. You can see by how he has gained the trusts of people constantly in the public eye.

“We all get dressed for Bill”, says Vogue editor Anna Wintour

Brooke Astor asked that Cunningham attend her 100th birthday party, the only member of the media invited.

Trust is key to a brand; people have to be able to trust a brand to do as they say and not cause problems for them.

Bill said, “The main thing I love about street photography is that you find the answers you don’t see at the fashion shows. You find information for readers so they can visualize themselves.” He takes fashion beyond the magazines and the runway elevating his name above the rest to be the first real street style photographer during World War II. He did something no one else did, and has stood out ever since because of his unrelenting love of what is real and out there. After taking a chance photograph of Greta Garbo, he published a group of impromptu pictures in the Times in December 1978, which soon became a regular series. His editor, Arthur Gelb, has called these photographs “a turning point for the Times, because it was the first time the paper had run pictures of well-known people without getting their permission.”

He transformed himself into a brand with these 5 core values- elevating himself above the rest while making strong statements in the industry. He has never changed regardless of fame or fortune he has lived the same way as he always has.  Can you make your own personal brand; your name quite as known and strong?

 

About the Elevator of the Week Series by Intern Yves

In the Elevator of the Week series we talk about people who are making a difference, and have created their own personal brand using the different values and techniques we here at STANCE use to support meaningful brands.

 

Bill Cunningham’s Work

Nescafé’s Pop-Up Cups | Case Study

Nescafé’s Pop-Up Cups | Case Study

Your daily routine may be quite lonely- especially for those coffee deprived. Imagine casually reading the morning newspaper, and suddenly all your attention is drawn to a bright red full-page ad that looks like something out of a pop-up book. Upon opening the ad, readers can unfold the paper mugs and fill them with hot water to produce an instant drink. The two mugs encourage readers to share their moment with someone around them, whether it be a stranger, co-worker, or friend.


Nescafe-Image1


Nescafé’s Pop-Up Café reintroduces coffee’s value in social communication. Nescafé simply wants to bring people together to drink their morning cup of coffee. Their innovative strategies work well to stress the everyday importance of their product, emphasizing an instant coffee experience that is both productive and spontaneous.

Nescafé has recognized what they need to communicate to stay relevant in a world dominated by huge coffee chains and and the “experience” of a cafe. The brand is beginning to emphasize the secondary and tertiary benefits that come along with the awesome advantage of a sweet, caffeinated boost.

 

Check out the video:

All and all, Nescafé’s social experiment is a refreshing example of how brands are capable of reintroducing key social elements back into consumer culture.

 

Our STANCE on Value

Our STANCE on Value

We have taken a solid stance on the word value.

 

Strive not to be a success, but rather to be of value. –Albert Einstein

 

Value is a word that is thrown around nowadays. When something is overused, you tend to forget the actual meaning. For example, the word asylum comes from the Greek word asylon which means sanctuary. Synonyms for this word are shelter, haven and retreat. Unfortunately, this isn’t what comes to mind when we hear the word asylum. We have negative thoughts- where “crazy” people are sent-and that may have to do with our tendency to put the word insane in front of it. Either way, as we use language throughout time and in different contexts, the social standard for the word changes. This is what is happening to the word value.

Value is used in numerous ways, mainly in monetary examples. You saved money at the grocery store, “Oh what a great value!” or as an assigned worth, “This vase is very valuable.” But if you think about it, we have it all wrong.

shareholder-value

Einstein clearly separated value from success. When you go to the grocery store and save money, we think of it as a success. When we are auctioning off a painting for charity, we want the greatest amount of money because it will be successful to sell it for a larger amount. We forget what value really is and the actual value the word has.

Value should be defined socially as the merit, the worth, the importance of. Sure, its the first definition that pops up in Google, but its not the first one that pops up in our minds.

Value is different from success because you can hold importance and merit without being successful. Being successful means you are wealthy, you have a high position, or numerous honors, but it doesn’t mean you actually hold any value!

When Einstein tells us to strive to be valuable, it means we need to hold a merit, to be important, to serve a purpose. Success isn’t mandatory and if you really were a person of value, success wouldn’t even be necessary because with value comes being humble.  This word[inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”amd5555″ suffix=”#takeastanceonvalue”] “value” is skewed in our minds because we tie it with success and as our culture has determined, the only people who are worth value, are those who are successful.[/inlinetweet]

This is false.

[inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”amd5555″ suffix=”#takeastanceonvalue”]The people who are truly valuable don’t need to be successful because they are content with serving their purpose and guiding others.[/inlinetweet]

 

This is what value truly stands for.

The Best Social Media Platforms to Create Brand Awareness for Your Business

The Best Social Media Platforms to Create Brand Awareness for Your Business

Congratulations. You have a business and know your brand strategy. Great. Take a moment to pat yourself on the back.

Now that your self-esteem is raised, let’s lower it. Since only you and your great grandma know of your brand, you’re in need of some brand awareness. There is no better way to reach out to your target audience than through social media. However, between all the blogging, tweeting, pinning a kale recipe that we know we’ll never try and “Instagraming” your outfit of the day (or #ootd), which one do you use? Several? All? Or none and just cry yourself to sleep?

Yes, you should have 3-4 different platforms, but which ones will help you determine the focus of your brand. To help you, below is a list of the most popular social media platforms (in alphabetical order to practice your ABCs) and what/when they’re best used for.

 

Blogs

This is one of the best ways to generate organic traffic through search engine optimizations (in case you forgot what SEO meant), as 77 percent Internet users read blogs. Also, 61 percent of U.S. consumers have made a purchase based on blog post, which is quite influential. The key is to give advice, insight and note coming-of-age trends.

River Pools and Spas does a great job of showing off their knowledge of pools and spas through informing the reader about topics such as an earthquake’s impact on a flexible fiberglass pool.

River-Pools-Spas-stance-branding-agency-las-vegas
River Pools and Spas’ blog is a great example of a company showing off their intelligence in their field, but also informing the reader with interesting content.

 

Facebook

With 1.28 billion monthly active users, Facebook is still the leader in the social media platforms, but their user demographics is significantly changing. Originally intended for college students, 72 percent of adults are now visiting Facebook monthly. Now It’s important for almost all businesses to have a Facebook page, however the most common reason determined to unlike a page is uninteresting content. So be sure you’re active and engaging, especially since 75 percent of of the engagements occurs in the first five hours of a post.

The owner of bareMinerals, Bare Escentuals, does a great a job of engagement as their fans are driving conversations with posts, likes, shares and comments.

bareminerals-stance-branding-agency-las-vegas
Bare Escentual’s BareMinerals Facebook page is run by its customers with their constant wall posts and engagement with the brand.

 

Google+

A site based on showing your circles posts you share, information about you and bringing together all your Google product accounts, 540 million active users dominate Google+. More than half of the interactions between a Google+ user and a brand is positive. This is probably one of the more underestimated platforms, but definitely something to be considered with its possibilities. Especially since there’s the possibility to do a live chat, which automatically adds to your connection with your audience.

Global communications and technology company, Alcatel-Lucent, does a great job of utilizing all of Google+’s products. They have live chats, videos from recent conferences and constant updates of posts relating to their brand.

Alcatel-Lucent-stance-branding-agency-las-vegas
The communications and technology company, Alcatel-Lucent, uses the best of Google+’s products with live chats, conference videos and a continuous update of posts relating back to their brand.

Instagram

With over 200 million active users, Instagram is all about connecting a community visually. With their addition of video, this allows businesses to create 15-second engaging videos for their audience to connect. 23 percent of teens alone consider Instagram to be their favorite social media platform, which can help boost your engagement incredibly if that’s your target audience.

The high-end designer Burberry incorporates video and images seamlessly from their runway shows to their behind-the-scenes design. The video below features a dance number in the windows of their Shanghai building.

 

LinkedIn

Known as the world’s largest professional network, LinkedIn’s 187 million active users are a force to be reckoned with. This is a great place to not only post your job applications (44,000 job applications are filled out daily), but to also create groups among colleagues that you may not see everyday.

Adobe is a great example of creating community and availability on LinkedIn. They provide different pages according to their audience – whether it be their Creative Cloud or Marketing Cloud, Adobe continues to have a two-way conversation with their determined audience.

Adobe-Creative-Marketing-stance-branding-agency-las-vegas
Adobe’s Marketing Cloud utilizes LinkedIn’s showcase pages toe engage their specific audience.

Pinterest

A platform dedicated to admiring fashion, food, do-it-yourself tutorials and dorm room designs, Pinterest is predominantly used by women (80 percent to be exact).

Oreck (yes, the vacuum), does surprisingly well. Not because they post interestingly angled pins of their vacuums sucking up the world, but rather an adorable kitten sitting on a recently vacuumed carpet. There’s the best of both worlds: proof their vacuums work and a cute kitten for the Pinterest ladies to “aw” and “ooh” over.

Oreck Vacuums Pinterest
Oreck, the vacuum company, exemplifies good use of engagement with their Pinterest audience through cute animals.

Snapchat

Dedicated to sharing your point of view, Snapchat has 30 million active users sending 1-10 second videos and seflies to their friends constantly. As 400 million Snapchats are sent daily, you might want to consider creating an account, but how would you do it? The World Wildlife Fund #LastSelfie Snapchat campaign raises awareness about endangered species. It’s extremely simple, but ridiculously powerful and effective.

 

Tumblr

A quirky and predominantly young micro-blogging platform (67 percent of users are under 35), Tumblr is not for the faint-hearted. A big user on gifs (an endless looping image), Fiat recently did an advertisement playing on that idea called, “Endless Fun.” If your target audience is young (a teenager to be exact) then this would be a good platform to consider.

 

Twitter

Dedicated to sharing ideas and information, Twitter is dominated by 255 million active users. Although you can tweet images and videos, Twitter is still content-based. Also, keep in mind that 77 percent of accounts are outside the U.S.

This is a great platform for a two-way conversation among followers.

For example, several of the car brands (Chevrolet, Ford, GM and Honda) are tweeting at people who post pictures of their new Camaro, answer customer questions or clarify misconceptions.

 

YouTube

More than 1 billion users are visiting YouTube where originally-created videos are uploaded and viewed. YouTube is the #2 search engine following in the giant footsteps of Google. With 80 percent of traffic outside of the U.S., this distribution platform can help your channel reach a large audience.

Several companies and talented individuals create series to keep a consistent audience coming back. Comedian Jenna Marbles gives brash advice and makes fun of herself and celebrities to her 13 million (and counting) subscribers. One of her most infamous series is “What Girls and Guys Do.”

Vine

Owned by Twitter, Vine has over 40 million users. Known to be the “best way to share life in motion,” these looping six-second long videos can be some of the funniest six-second moments of your day. 60 percent of Musicians’ Vines are retweeted while the weekends are most popular for sharing Vines.

The U.K.-based animation studio, Animate & Create, did an effortless and effective job of creating an old-fashioned flip book. It showcases their talents, but also adds some delight to your Vine feed.

 

At STANCE, one of the ways we achieve our purpose of elevating meaningful brands is by leveraging technology to create brand awareness. One of our popular service offerings is Social Media Management which takes away the pain and mystery of managing your own social media accounts. We do all the above for you.

Backed by research, we create a powerful social media marketing strategy that will ensure your brand reaches the audience it’s meant to serve. Find more information about how Social Media Management can benefit your business.

So the key is to never forget your target audience. Hang out where they hang out. If you don’t have customers on Vine, then don’t get one just to get one. It’s a waste of your precious time.

Also, to prove the point of having more than one social media platform, each of these profiting companies listed as examples have at least two other active accounts. So [inlinetweet prefix=”null” tweeter=”null” suffix=”null”]expand your brand awareness from just you and your grandma, to everyone and their grandma.[/inlinetweet]

Why “July Fourth” is a Strong Brand

Why “July Fourth” is a Strong Brand

Branding Lessons You Can Learn from “Fourth of July” (The Brand)

As I write this, millions of Americans are enjoying a day off as part of the July 4th celebration tradition that has existed for over two centuries. It has now been 238 years since the signing of the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776.

July 4th has been a federal holiday in the United States since 1941, but the tradition of Independence Day celebrations goes back to the 18th century and the American Revolution (1775-83).

[inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=”#IndependenceDay”]Fun Fact: The initial date the resolution of independence was approved in a closed session of Congress was July 2, 1776.[/inlinetweet]

The next day, John Adams remarked in a letter to his wife Abigail: “The second day of July, 1776, will be the most memorable epoch in the history of America. I am apt to believe that it will be celebrated by succeeding generations as the great anniversary festival. It ought to be commemorated as the day of deliverance, by solemn acts of devotion to God Almighty.”

Beyond the parades, concerts, casual family gatherings, barbecues & fireworks, today I invite you to take a step back and view July 4th from a new angle- to view it as the strong brand it is.

 

Characteristics of a Strong Brand

 

Clear Purpose

Every strong brand has a purpose- a reason for being (beyond making money). Brands that are purpose-driven that is clearly articulated and communicated to it’s audience helps elevate the brand by building a strong emotional connection with the audience that identify with the purpose.

July 4th’s purpose is to remind Americans about the day they got their independence. It marks a significant day the US nation declared its independence from the British Monarchy in 1776.

 

What it stands for

Great brands stand for something. When  a brand is clear on what it stands for based on it’s purpose, it makes it very easy for the target audience to connect with it.

As a brand, July 4th stands for freedom, independence and a brighter future. This is very clear and it’s reinforced year after year with each holiday celebration.

 

Name & Nicknames

Strong brands have a clear, unique and distinct name. Naming is very important in brand building because it provides a point of reference and identification. Names provide associations and carry meanings in the minds of the consumer.

Furthermore, most brands just like people have nicknames; e.g. McDonald’s is Mickey D’s, Coca Cola is “Coke”, Federal Express is “FedEx”, Chevrolet is “Chevy”.

In the same way, Independence Day is a clear name that communicates what the day stands for. Other nicknames used to refer the same are “July 4th”, and “Fourth of July”.

 

Traditions

Strong brands need traditions. Victoria Secret & Macy’s have both been phenomenal at this with VS All Access fashion show & Macy’s Thanksgiving Parade respectively.

Some of the traditions practiced on Independence day include; family getting together, time off from work (most jobs) and of course fireworks!

 

Serve a Specific Target Audience

[inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=”#branding”]To build a strong brand, you need to identify who the brand is meant to serve.[/inlinetweet] This enables you to learn everything about your target audience and tailor your message to appeal to them.

Similarly, Independence Day celebrations are geared towards the “American citizens market”

As you can see, the above characteristics show how strong of a brand the Independence Day Holiday really is. When you review your brand, does it have the characteristics outlined above? If so, what are ways you can implement them?

 

Funny Video

Lastly, in the light of the holiday, here is a video to make your day. Enjoy :)

How to Cope with the Negative Face of a Brand

How to Cope with the Negative Face of a Brand

Reflect back to December where gifts and holidays are a commonality, however Target graced us with a disclosure that hackers stole credit and debit card information from millions of customers. Or travel back another three years to BP’s Gulf of Mexico oil spill, which is recognized as the worst oil spill in U.S. history.  Both BP and Target experienced the concept of negative face.

Face Negotiation Theory


This concept stems from Stella Ting-Toomey’s Face Negotiation Theory, as she described the concept of our self-image, or face. We all have a positive and a negative face, which is defined by our culture’s reaction. It could be something as little as not saying “thank you” to a generous donation or “accidentally” sneezing on someone to add to our negative face. In an individualistic culture like the United States, the perspective of face is reflective on the individual. So, in turn, the individual determines our positive and negative face (compared to a collective group).

This very concept is easily reflected within the core definition behind a brand. At its bare basics, a brand is the gut emotion evoked by the customer (best described by Marty Neumeier). So in turn,[inlinetweet prefix=”null” tweeter=”null” suffix=”null”] the customer or individual determines the face of the brand, which can be a different evoked emotion for each individual.[/inlinetweet]

Now, let’s say the brand got itself into a pickle and is now reflecting a negative face to the customer. This could be something as little as posting a tweet linking to a disliked article or forgetting to send out a thank you letter to a recent client…or hackers and oil spills for Target and BP. Whatever the situation was, the brand is now stuck with this distasteful image.

Five Different Approaches

Ting-Toomey said there are five different approaches we take to save both our face and the face of the other in communication. We can dominate (win/lose), avoid (lose/lose), oblige (lose/win), compromise (lose/lose) or integrate (win/win). Obviously the best option from these is integration. This is simply by recognizing there’s a conflict amongst both parties and agree to resolve the problem together.

target-shoppers-stance-branding-agency-las-vegas

So in the brand’s recent situation with the negligence of a thank you letter, they would contact the client and meet with them to formally apologize. Both parties will discuss any issues and integrate a new solution together.

Target responded with integration, resorting back to its positive face by providing coupons for customers and then also hiring a new security chief six months after the incident. For BP, despite their efforts to remove the oil and their negative face, there is still some left today. The company responded with providing $500 million towards the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative: a 10-year independent research program.

The key behind a brand’s positive face or image is connected engagement with the audience, as well as being consistent with each individual’s evoked emotions.

However, [inlinetweet prefix=”null” tweeter=”null” suffix=”null”]we’ll all come across moments of negative face and when that happens remember to integrate and communicate. If we don’t, then we’ll be stuck with a distasteful image.[/inlinetweet]

 

 

Brand With a Purpose- My Kid’z Adventures

Brand With a Purpose- My Kid’z Adventures

Ladies and Gentlemen, we have found a Meaningful Children’s Brand with a Purpose!

As a parent, you are your children’s number one fan. You believe in your child 100%. Unfortunately, sometimes children don’t feel the same way about themselves as you do and don’t believe they can do anything they set their minds to. There is a brand out there that allows your favorite person to be the center of attention and see themselves on numerous amazing adventures!

 

My Kid’z Adventures

mka

It is common to place yourself in a novel you’re reading, to feel as though you’re in the minds of the character and apart of the plot. My Kid’z Adventures does all of this! This brand allows you to create books with the help of your child. Instead of some ol’ boring story, your child is placed into a new playground filled with fun graphics and bright colors. There are multiple settings to be your child’s new playground-the circus, camping, the beach, the farm, and the world! Each setting is host to many different fun activities your child will participate in! When your child is at the farm, he/she will milk cows, your child will surf at the beach, do some really cool magic tricks at the circus, and have a warm campfire at the campground. Furthermore, the books are also helpful for learning Spanish. Every word on the page has a Spanish translation. Common words like milk and butterfly are fast and simple for your child to learn in the books. Plus, on the bottom of every page is a recipe for you and your child to try. They’re fun and simple tying in items your child probably doesn’t eat often like papaya and basil. Plus, they sound absolutely delicious!

Now you might be wondering how your child is actually in the adventures.
Their picture is on every page!

farmGirl-detail1

 

Plus, their name is on it!

singleCircusPrinted_boy

 

 

Getting started is really easy too! 

First, you choose the theme of the book based on your child’s gender and the adventure you want your child to explore! Each adventure has both a male and female version so your daughter can do all of the things any boy can do and vice versa! Then, you pick your package. You can order just one, or many more. Plus, there is a digital series and you can easily order each adventure for you child with just one click! After you have made your decision, the really fun stuff starts begins!

Your child gets to be the star of the show by showin’ off their complete adorableness and modeling for 11-16 pictures. The cuter and funnier the pictures are, the better! This book is to show off your superstar’s personality as much as possible. Once those are done, it gets even better!

You can dedicate your child’s book to any friend or family member your both are close to and have it be a gift to them as well. You love your child, but you’re not the only one. That’s why these book are such great gifts and can be shared across the whole family.

Purpose

 

A child’s self esteem is important for their growth. The amount they have carries on through not only their childhood, but the rest of their lives. With the recent publicity of bullying, the lack of self esteem children have is unreal. When Nuria Sanchez created My Kid’z Adventures, she hoped to elevate the lives of the children who saw themselves in their own books, doing things they never thought they could do.  [inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”@amd5555″ suffix=”#brandwithapurpose”]My Kid’z Adventures is an outlet for children to begin believing in themselves and seeing themselves how others perceive them: as the awesome little people they are- making My Kid’s Adventures a brand with a purpose. [/inlinetweet]

 

Go ahead, see how happy this child and his family are when seeing themselves on an adventure for the first time. (:

The Power of Colors in Branding

The Power of Colors in Branding

Colors are vital to the success of your brand.

color wheel, branding

Often times the importance of colors are overlooked when branding. The color palette for your brand should be determined only after research of your target audience and once the personality of your brand is defined. How easy would it be for a new business owner to simply pick their favorite colors for their brand? Super easy, but it shouldn’t work that way!

Step One:

The colors chosen for your brand should tie along with the purpose and the personality you want to convey to your customers.

Let’s imagine a few scenarios really quick:
Imagine if the whole world was blue. Trees were blue, grass was blue, your skin was blue, everything blue.
How would you feel? Which emotions would you feel most?
Again, imagine if the whole world was red? How about black?

[inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”@amd5555″ suffix=””]Our emotions change with the colors we see. Every color has a purpose and a personality attached to it.[/inlinetweet]

Allow me  to help you get an idea of the type of colors best for your brand. You probably have an idea, but it’s usually not as apparent as it may seem.
You have a baby clothing brand, your colors should reflect pastels and should be gender neutral-yellow, green.
You have a Hawaiian restaurant. Your colors should reflect the Hawaiian community. Bright pinks, bright greens.

In regards to making your colors reflect your purpose, here at STANCE, our colors are red and tangaroa. Red is a bold, strong color associated with motivation and a desire to take action. Tangaroa (sample here) is a deep blue color. Dark blues instill trust and authority while still maintaining stability. We are trustworthy, highly motivated and action oriented, yet still stable and strong. Our colors reflect how we have positioned ourselves and our promise to our customers.

Choose the colors that will reflect your brand’s personality best-how you want the customer’s to perceive your brand. We are visual people. We get an idea of a person by what they’re wearing and the colors they use when presenting themselves. Your brand colors should do the same.

Color creates, enhances, changes, reveals, and establishes the mood of the painting. –Kiff Holland

Step Two:

These colors should relate to the brand’s target audience and still be visually appealing. During research, it should be determined the demographic of your primary audience and the colors that most influence them.

menvswomen colors when branding

 

Step Three:

A brand’s colors will also create consistency.  These colors will be everywhere in your business-logo design, collateral, websites, social media, packaging, etc. If it turns out the colors are not depicting what you had in mind, you’ll have to start over and that can be costly.

color branding collateral

 

Once step three is accomplished, the colors chosen for the brand should relate all of the personality the brand has to its target audience. The colors should also be used in all forms of business material to create consistency throughout the brand. Let your colors prove to the world your purpose.

Always is Elevating the Confidence of Girls Worldwide with #LikeAGirl Campaign

Always is Elevating the Confidence of Girls Worldwide with #LikeAGirl Campaign

Procter & Gamble’s Always brand just released a video from their new #LikeAGirl campaign. The campaign, from ad agency Leo Burnett hopes to forever change the negative connotation underlying the “like a girl” phrase that is meant as an insult.

When did the phrase ‘like a girl’ become so negative?

Regardless of gender, watching the video does makes you take a step back and reflect on the times you might have used the phrase as an insult. Always did a great job at connecting with their core audience with an issue that is not only important but meaningful as well.

Through this campaign, Always elevates the confidence of young  girls who will in turn develop an emotional connection with the brand every time they encounter the “like a girl” situation. This is a win-win situation for girls worldwide and the brand as well.

Campaign Q & A from the Ad Agency’s website

How did you discover this unique tension point in the perception of doing something #LikeAGirl?
JJ: ‘Half of girls lose their confidence during puberty’ is such a powerful fact. In our efforts to bring Rewrite the Rules, our new platform for Always to life, we wanted our first act to address the things that contribute to the drop of confidence in girls. Amongst all the work from the Chicago, London and Toronto team, there was one that simply said, ‘Let’s change the meaning of Like A Girl’. We all felt it in the room. That was it.

BS: The phrase has become so ubiquitous, you have to stop and say “Hey, wait – was that an insult?” And then in true Baader-Meinhof form, you start hearing it everywhere. People say it without thinking and that’s what we’re trying change. It’s not always a pointed insult – but an unthinking pattern of behavior that people don’t even realize is destructive to girls.

How did you go about capturing this tension on film?
JJ: It starts with getting a great director and then asking meaningful questions. Like all social experiments, you go in with a hypothesis of the responses you’ll get, but the responses we got were so much more personal and revealing than we had imagined.

BS: That’s the genius of Lauren Greenfield—her ability to make people so comfortable that they reveal their deepest thoughts and beliefs. She pulled it right out of them.

Why did you choose documentarian Lauren Greenfield to help tell this story?
JJ: We looked at a lot of directors but in the end, we all felt there was only one director who was perfect, Lauren. Her previous work showed her deep understanding of girls and women, and also how she could find the honesty on each issue.

BS: She’s been on our radar forever; we have all these female brands and understanding teen girls is her life work. We first worked with Lauren ten years ago – on a series of print ads for P&G’s Being Girl – and won a Gold Lion at Cannes. There was no second choice.

Can you describe a defining #LikeAGirl moment that you experienced while growing up?
JJ: I can’t think of one defining moment. It’s really been a series of moments where you say I’m going to do it the only way I know how and I’m going to do it unapologetically.

BS: I was the first girl in the history of my high school to run for Student Council President; lots of people were quite indignant. It was fine to aspire to vice president, but no higher. Well, I won… and it completely paved the way for other girls to demonstrate self confidence without ridicule.

How does this campaign define what it means to be #LikeAGirl?
JJ: This campaign is more about redefining what it means and rallying people behind that.

BS: A girl can do anything she wants. Proudly. Enthusiastically. Without apology.

What do you hope this campaign will bring to light in the minds of young girls?
JJ: I hope this campaign makes girls feel awesome about being a girl and doing things like a girl. I hope they feel that they are part of a sisterhood that supports and encourages them to go be great.

BS: Young girls already believe they’re capable of doing anything – we certainly don’t want to change them. We want to change the society they are growing up in so they don’t suffer the crisis of confidence during puberty that affects girls twice as much as boys.

How can girls get involved with Always #LikeaGirl?
JJ: Start using #LIKEAGIRL in a positive way. Be a role model.

BS: Through social media. They can start by tweeting the amazing things they do #likeagirl! It will be fun to turn that hashtag on its head!

– See more at: http://www.leoburnett.com/articles/work/what-it-means-to-be-likeagirl/#sthash.t53dJqx8.dpuf

Brand with a Purpose – theCream

Brand with a Purpose – theCream

Ladies and Gentlemen, we have found a Meaningful Skincare Brand with a Purpose!

In a world full of beauty and the next best thing, we are constantly bombarded with products promising to elevate your life. Unfortunately, the majority of these products are false hopes- filled with unnatural preservatives, short lasting effects, and watered down active ingredients. Fortunately, there is hope and I’m spreading the wonderful news!

theCream

 theCream

I recently was introduced to theCream-a moisturizer that is 100% natural and made with Colostrum. For those of you who might not know what Colostrum is, it is a protein filled form of milk produced in mammals to be given to their babies right after birth. When used as a moisturizer, it aids the growth of cells and the reproduction of skin cells. theCream gets its Colostrum from natural grass fed cows in New Zealand, a place known for its knowledge in dairy sciences. If mammals produce this to give life to their babies, it will give life to our skin.

thecream-natural-skincare

My meaningful experience with theCream:

After one application of theCream, my skin felt remarkable. I have naturally dry skin, with excess oil in my t-zone. I didn’t have that problem when I used theCream. I felt refreshed and moist. My skin wasn’t tight nor oily. The effects lasted the whole day and I was able to wear my normal makeup over it. After only three days of use, my skin felt new! I didn’t have dry, flakey skin and I didn’t need as much powder throughout the day. It really felt like layers of bad skin had been removed and replaced with soft, moist, and fresh looking skin. It’s great to see a product like this available for everyone. theCream is a genuine product that isn’t watered down and doesn’t have any ingredients you can’t pronounce.

[inlinetweet prefix=”theCream is a brand with a purpose.” tweeter=”@stancebranding” suffix=”#brandwithapurpose”]theCream is a brand with a purpose.[/inlinetweet]

They want what’s best for not only their customers, but for the world. They don’t want us to put unnatural and harmful ingredients on our skin. theCream  moisturizes our skin even better than all of the other moisturizers and will do it without harming our bodies. It gives me hope to see a brand in a world of false promises actually prove to be beneficial to our health.   Check out their video below. It’s definitely an eye opener.

 

 

Please share some brands you have also found to have a meaningful purpose. It’s always nice to elevate the lives of those around us.