Blog : Brand Architecture

Why have a Brand with Purpose

Why have a Brand with Purpose

Why have a Brand With Purpose?

Consumers and marketers have conflicting ideas about brand purpose: They disagree on where brands should concentrate their efforts, and on which people are most receptive. As reported on a new research from the World Federation of Advertisers.

Only 40% of marketers thought that listening to and acting on customer needs was important to brand purpose, but in a parallel study by PR Agency Edelman, consumers chose “Listens to customer needs and feedback” as the number one attribute that builds brand trust.

The traditional function of brand positioning has come to a standstill. In other words, it is more rewarding to find your brand purpose and promote it, rather that promoting a competitive edge. One of the Key speakers at the IMC Conference, Jonty Fisher explains why.

“Having a clear and well established purpose for your business will help create much more relevance with consumers by focusing on what is a brand’s real motivation: What is the WHY underneath the HOW and WHAT that you do, hence seamlessly connect with the consumers on a belief and purpose level; as opposed to something that is purely based on a functional benefit that might not necessarily move them emotively. As we know consumer make decisions based on emotive benefits and post rationalize decisions based on the functional benefits that the brand holds. In summary, your functional benefits are your permission to play but your emotive or purpose is your way to win in modern market.”

 


This is the way forward from the standstill in modern market that will enable marketers to reach their intended consumers. This is what Stance Branding Agency thrives to provide all its clients on a daily basis.

 

What is Purpose?

Purpose is the deepest expression of a brand, drawing on its essence to determine its path in the world. It captures the relationship between corporation and community, touching on the financial, social, and environmental arenas. Today, people think of companies as corporate citizens. They expect companies to put their skills and resources to work for the common good, and they’re ready to reward those that do.

In China, 80% of consumers say they are willing to pay a premium for a product that supports good causes, compared with just 28% in the U.K. and 39% in the U.S. In India, it’s 71%, while 55% of Brazilians and Malaysians are prepared to pay more.

five-shocking-credit-card-debt-statistics

 

 

What is Brand Purpose?

Brand purpose is a natural outgrowth of the values embedded in your corporate culture. Call it corporate citizenship or corporate social responsibility; companies that have integrated this approach into their business strategy are seeing the profound benefits of taking an active role in changing the world. Social good and business good are deeply entwined in today’s corporate model.

The WFA surveyed 828 brand marketers from 33 countries, representing more than 400 companies and together accounting for $170 billion in global marketing spend, via email. The Edelman consumer study, which surveyed 8,000 consumers in 16 markets, makes it clear that brand purpose in 2014 is more about customer relationship management than corporate social responsibility.

Mr Loerke added, “It becomes clear that purpose isn’t necessarily about saving the planet. It doesn’t have to be worthy per se; it can be about taking small and meaningful actions.”

Marketers may be convinced that having purpose is crucial: 88% agreed that it is increasingly important to building brands. That is why huge companies are changing their marketing strategies with marketing campaigns to ensure they have a meaningful brand that appeals to the public in an deeper, emotional level. Showing that they are part of consumers’ lives and not just pushing for their products and services blindly, because the consumers are the market kings thus dictating the markets share.

Meaningful-Brands

What drives your Brand?

Purpose driven branding, while not new, has taken on new significance in this era of anxious consumers; not to mention anxious employees. A company that looks at its brand and asks not simply what promise does it make, but what purpose does it serve, to its customers and its shareholders, and brings this purpose to life through every customer experience will be the company most likely to beat its competition.

The consumers have spoken, and if any marketer wants not only to remain in the modern market but also remain relevant and profitable; they have to embrace this ideology. That’s why here at STANCE we help you answer the question “What value do I provide?” in a positive way, hence at the end of the day both your brand and your audience benefit.

“In this ever-changing society, the most powerful and enduring brands are built from the heart. They are real and sustainable. Their foundations are stronger because they are built with the strength of the human spirit, not an ad campaign. The companies that are lasting are those that are authentic.” ― Howard Schultz

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Defining a Brand Name by Its Innuendos

Defining a Brand Name by Its Innuendos

The name of a brand is the key to its identity – it’s what people say when they recognize your logo or tagline. This name isn’t (or shouldn’t, at least) be taken lightly — it’s like naming your child; it requires some thought and deeper meaning.

However, not all babies are named as thoughtfully such as Fox India Owen, Bear Winslet, North West, Cricket Pearl Silverstein or the lovely Rosalind Arusha Arkadina Altalune Florence Thurman-Busson (yes, that’s one person).

Some brands have followed in these poor babies’ footsteps with unusual names (that don’t work) and oddly enough, several have some awkward sexual implications.

 

Kum & Go

Based in West Des Moines, Iowa, this convenience store attempted to do a play on the phrase, “come and go,” however I’m not sure if it was the best option they could have picked in 1975. If anything, they’re extremely memorable.

kum-and-go-stance-branding-agency-las-vegas

 

Smashburger

With the motto, “Smashed Fresh. Served Delicious,” Smashburger apparently does just that to serve tasty burgers (no matter it’s implications).

 

BJ’s (Restaurant | Brewhouse)

There are too many places with this name (from a wholesale club to a 99 cent store), but a prominent one here in Las Vegas is the restaurant BJ’s, where they promise you’ll be greeted with, “Welcome to BJ’s!”  They’ve been flaunting a good restaurant owned by BJ since 1978. Simply put, there’s too many inferences that can be made from this name.

bjs-stance-branding-agency-las-vegas

 

Grey Poupon

A Kraft Foods product, this dijon mustard may be the best-selling Dijon-style mustard (there isn’t much competition) in the U.S., but it also may make you second guess the process in making the condiment. It’s a partnership between Maurice Grey and Auguste Poupon since 1886, but no matter how you say it doesn’t sound like their tagline in the video below: “One of life’s finer pleasures.”


Now yes, it’s important to have thought behind your brand name (which all of these listed do), but it’s also important to realize how people will perceive your name. If you want sexual implications when people think of your restaurant, then go ahead and name it “BJ’s,” but if not then be sure to reassess that decision. [inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=””]It’s a risk to stick with an odd name, but just be sure to own it if you do.[/inlinetweet]

These companies below have odd names, but do a good job of making fun at themselves while still creating a positive face for their brand.

 

Fresh Body: Fresh Balls

A personal hygiene brand dedicated to keeping you “So Fresh and So Dry,” they really go all out to take care of a man’s genitalia. Also, don’t worry they feature Fresh Breasts too, ladies.

Thus, this video shows the very concern involved with a man’s sweat in his not so talked about regions.

 

Poo-Pourri

It’s literally what it sounds like. A freshener that you spray prior to dropping the motherload (or using the restroom) to prevent others from smelling what you just did in the bathroom.

This video shows their great use of playing on their awkward name and concept altogether.

 

[inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=””]So when you name your brand, be sure it’s something you’d proud to hear in conversation.[/inlinetweet] It’s just like naming your baby — you want it to thoughtful and meaningful. Unusual brand names are great, but only when they’re marketed appropriately and reach their desired audience.

 

Branch into Brand Architecture

Branch into Brand Architecture

Think of a family tree.

Regardless of how far it goes back, you see many branches-grandma, grandpa, mom, dad, children etc.
Family trees structure a family and determine how each is tied together.

Now,  let’s think of a family name.

The father usually carries the name and then the children he produces carry on his name. 
This name links a family together, loses other members in the process, but depending on what same may call fate, the name is carried on through the birth of new children.


 

Family trees behave similarly to brand architecture. A company has a whole lineage of brands: parent brands (grandparents), subbrands (parents) , and then endorsed brands (children). Brand architecture links all of the brands together, but also differentiates them based on their purpose.

Parent Brands

Parent brands are extensions of a brand into many different product categories. Examples include companies like Apple or Microsoft that have many different products, but the products are associated with their name.

Subbrands

Subbrands are new brands that are still tied to the parent brand, but have created an identity for themselves. They are more relevant to a new target or to a different product category. For example, Apple’s introduction of their iPhones created a subbrand for their company.

Endorsed Brands

Endorsed brands are the brands people are most familiar with and are household names. They are given credibility by the subbrand and the parent brand, but are their own identity in the customer’s eyes. An example of an endorsed brand would be the specific iPhone 5 or the iPhone 5c. They are specific products working under both the iPhone and the Apple name.

Family names are just more examples of how the branding and sub branding works. Defined with brand architecture, the “family name” of your brand will be determined, and then the following “children” will be linked to it. These sub-brands still have their own identity -they’re still people anyway!

[inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”StanceBranding” suffix=””]Brand architecture narrows the focus of a company and determines the levels of the brand and how they relate to each other[/inlinetweet], if they do. Grandma may not be related to Cousin. Furthermore, it also determines which brands need the main focus and if there is any that are parasites to your company and success.

Family trees are important. They determine our identity and explain our history. Without them, we would have no idea who we are and the who are the greatest influencers in our lives. Family names allow us to know our direct identity, the people we share our immediate relevance with. These determine our own brand architecture. They help us know our levels and how all of our levels complete us as a whole.